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Thursday, December 27, 2007

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St. John


1 John 1:1-4
Psalm 97
John 20:1-8

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loving the invisible

"This life became visible; we have seen and bear witness to it, and we proclaim to you the eternal life that was present to the Father and became visible to us." —1 John 1:2

God, Who is Spirit (Jn 4:24) and therefore invisible, became visible to us when He was conceived in Mary's womb and born in Bethlehem. When the Word became flesh, it became possible for us to see God (1 Jn 1:1). John "saw and believed" (Jn 20:8). "Mary Magdalene went to the disciples. 'I have seen the Lord!' she announced" (Jn 20:18). "The other disciples kept telling [Thomas] 'We have seen the Lord!' " (Jn 20:25) Thomas became a believer because he saw the Lord, but "blest are they who have not seen and have believed" (Jn 20:29).

However, Jesus' incarnation and birth are not primarily ways of becoming visible, but are expressions of infinite love. Therefore, our relationship with the Lord is not based on a sensory response to His visibleness but on our faith-response to His love. "Although you have never seen Him, you love Him, and without seeing you now believe in Him, and rejoice with inexpressible joy touched with glory because you are achieving faith's goal, your salvation" (1 Pt 1:8-9).

Prayer:  Father, may I "walk by faith, not by sight" (2 Cor 5:7).

Promise:  "Our purpose in writing you this is that our joy may be complete." —1 Jn 1:4

Praise:  St. John's faith carried him to the foot of the cross and then to the glory of the resurrection.

Reference:  (For a related teaching, order our tape on Jesus' Incarnation on audio AV 52-3 or video V-52.)

Rescript:  †Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Vicar General Archdiocese of Cincinnati, July 30, 2007

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