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Sunday, October 12, 2008

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28th Sunday Ordinary Time


Isaiah 25:6-10
Philippians 4:12-14, 19-20
Psalm 23
Matthew 22:1-14

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fishin' hole

"Invite to the wedding anyone you come upon." —Matthew 22:9

God wants His house to be full for His heavenly banquet (Lk 14:23). His strategy for filling His house is to send His servants all over His kingdom, especially to the byroads (Mt 22:9), alleys (Lk 14:21), and other unlikely places. Thus, God's banquet will only be filled if His servants "come upon" (Mt 22:9) people that are hard to locate.

Jesus understands this dilemma. That's why He specifically calls His servants "fishers of men" (Mt 4:19). Any fisherman who wants to bring home a catch knows that he will probably not easily "come upon" large numbers of fish; rather, he must learn "how to cope with every circumstance" (Phil 4:12). He knows that he must study the habits of the fish and spend much time, effort, and frustration learning their favorite feeding places and times. A leisurely midday fishing trip might be convenient for the fisherman, but he will likely bring home an empty boat. His best catch might come before dawn, in freezing weather, in dangerous waters, or after many unsuccessful attempts. The main question is: Will the fisherman take the trouble to "come upon" the fish?

Politicians, salespeople, telemarketers, and researchers understand this concept clearly. Their daring boldness in reaching the unreachable leads to success in their ventures. Followers of Jesus, "open your eyes and see! The fields are shining for harvest!" (Jn 4:35) There's a house to be filled. Bring them in (Lk 14:21).

Prayer:  Father, I will take the appropriate initiative to reach the people You want me to come upon (Lk 16:8).

Promise:  "My God in turn will supply your needs fully, in a way worthy of His magnificent riches in Christ Jesus." —Phil 4:19

Praise:  Praise Jesus, Who walked to Emmaus and through walls to invite all to the feast!

Reference:  (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)

Rescript:  †Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, May 1, 2008

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