< <  

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

  > >
2 Corinthians 3:4-11
Psalm 99:5-9
Matthew 5:17-19

View Readings
Similar Reflections

Actualmente, este contenido solo está disponible en inglés.

teach the old testament

"Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law and the Prophets." —Matthew 5:17

When the Bible speaks of "the Law and the Prophets," it refers to the Old Testament. Peter preached from the Old Testament on the day of Pentecost, and three thousand people received the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:17, 25, 34). "The ministry of the Spirit" (2 Cor 3:8) began by the preaching of the ministry of the law.

Jesus' Transfiguration featured the Law, represented by Moses, and the Prophets, represented by Elijah (Lk 9:30). When Jesus was transfigured into a greater glory (Lk 9:29ff), He didn't just bypass the old covenant, He fulfilled it (Mt 5:17). Thus the presence of Moses and Elijah at His Transfiguration shows the Old Testament has a place in the New Testament's ministry of the Spirit.

On Easter evening, Jesus changed the hearts of His two disciples on the road to Emmaus by opening the Scriptures to them, which at that point consisted of only the Old Testament. Jesus began with "Moses and all the prophets" and "interpreted for them every passage of Scripture which referred to Him" (Lk 24:27).

Jesus declared that the Old Testament is more capable of effecting change on a hard heart than would be the sight of a man risen from the dead! (Lk 16:31) Read the Old Testament. Then teach the Old Testament to a hard-hearted world (Mt 5:19).

Prayer:  Holy Spirit, show me how the Old Testament is fulfilled in the New, and how the New Testament is revealed by the Old.

Promise:  "This great confidence in God is ours, through Christ." —2 Cor 3:4

Praise:  Presentation Ministries' youth group has a tradition of presenting stories from the Old Testament in dramatic form which has touched the hearts of many.

Reference:  (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)

Rescript:  †Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, January 5, 2009

The Nihil Obstat ("Permission to Publish") is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted the Nihil Obstat agree with the contents, opinions, or statements expressed.