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Monday, October 28, 2013

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Sts. Simon & Jude


Ephesians 2:19-22
Psalm 19:2-5
Luke 6:12-16

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patron of the impossible

Jesus "selected twelve of them to be His apostles...Simon called the Zealot, Judas son of James, and Judas Iscariot, who turned traitor." —Luke 6:13, 15-16

Jude has become known as the patron of the impossible. His partner among the apostles was "Simon called the Zealot." A Zealot was what we would call a terrorist or guerilla. Consequently, Jude's first partner was probably an impossible person. Maybe that's how he became patron of the impossible.

No matter how impossible you are, you probably aren't any more impossible than Simon, Jude's namesake Judas, or the other Simon, whose name Jesus changed to Peter. Thus, if you team up with Jude, he can probably help you. He is used to impossible people, and you aren't any worse than any other of the countless impossible people he's worked with over centuries.

Jude is an apostle, a canonized saint, and part of the foundation of the Church (Eph 2:20). Even some of the impossible people he has worked with are saints — for example, Simon. Ask Jude to pray for and work with you. He will lead you to totally commit your life to Jesus. That is when the impossible starts to happen. St. Jude, pray for us.

Prayer:  Father, may I firmly believe that nothing is impossible for You (Lk 1:37).

Promise:  "Through [Jesus] the whole structure is fitted together and takes shape as a holy temple in the Lord; in Him you are being built into this temple, to become a dwelling place for God in the Spirit." —Eph 2:21-22

Praise:  Sts. Simon and Jude "went from village to village, spreading the good news everywhere and curing diseases" (Lk 9:6).

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, May 22, 2013

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