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Sunday, May 4, 2014

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Third Sunday of Easter


Acts 2:14, 22-33
1 Peter 1:17-21
Psalm 16:1-2, 5, 7-11
Luke 24:13-35

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sunday afternoons

"Were not our hearts burning inside us as He talked to us on the road and explained the Scriptures to us?" —Luke 24:32

On the afternoon of His resurrection, Jesus walked about seven miles with two of His disciples and "interpreted for them every passage of Scripture which referred to Him" (Lk 24:27). He did this even though His last three years of teaching the apostles seemed ineffective, for they had abandoned Him when He was executed. As Jesus taught His two disciples, their hearts were burning and being purified (Lk 24:32). That evening of His resurrection, Jesus continued His ministry of teaching by opening the apostles' minds to the understanding of the Scriptures (Lk 24:45). Jesus' teaching of the Scriptures eventually bore fruit at Pentecost.

Seven Sundays after the Sunday of Jesus' resurrection, Peter spent Sunday afternoon as Jesus had done on the Sunday of His resurrection. Peter preached God's Word from Joel 3, Psalm 16, and Psalm 110 (Acts 2:17, 25, 34). Hearts were burning, minds were opening, and the Church was being born.

The Church continues this pattern to the present day. As God's Word is proclaimed, we recognize the risen Jesus and receive the Holy Spirit. Abide in God's Word (Jn 8:31). Witness for the risen Jesus (Acts 2:32). Receive new Pentecosts.

Prayer:  Father, Your Word is more precious to me than thousands of dollars (see Ps 119:72).

Promise:  "In prayer you call upon a Father Who judges each one justly on the basis of his actions. Since this is so, conduct yourselves reverently during your sojourn in a strange land." —1 Pt 1:17

Praise:  "You will show me the path to life, fullness of joys in Your presence, the delights at Your right hand forever" (Ps 16:11). Alleluia!

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, October 30, 2013

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