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Tuesday, September 6, 2016

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1 Corinthians 6:1-11
Psalm 149:1-6, 9
Luke 6:12-19

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suing and reaping

"Why, the very fact that you have lawsuits against one another is disastrous for you." —1 Corinthians 6:7

The Lord reveals in the Bible that it is disastrous for Christians to sue Christians. This results in injuring and cheating those who may have injured and cheated us (1 Cor 6:8). Suing other Christians can make us unholy and deprive us from inheriting God's kingdom, even though we have been "washed, consecrated, justified in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ and in the Spirit of our God" (1 Cor 6:11). Even if we have a just lawsuit, it's better to "put up with injustice" and let ourselves be cheated rather than sue a Christian (1 Cor 6:7; see also Mt 5:39ff). This applies to suing any Christians, including those as worldly as were the Corinthians.

Like the Corinthians, Christians today don't pay much attention to the Biblical prohibition against suing Christians. How many Christians do you know who refuse to take another person to court because that person is a Christian? Haven't we seen the Bible proven true as Christians today are subjected to disaster after disaster? Haven't we also seen masses of Christians become more and more unholy rather than holy? The Bible has once again been proven true, and the "better ideas" of our culture have again failed. The wisdom of God is not the same as the wisdom of this age (1 Cor 2:6ff). Live by God's wisdom. Live the Bible.

Prayer:  Father, may I obey 1 Corinthians 6, and not be trapped by the blind spots of our culture (see 2 Cor 4:4).

Promise:  "Indeed, the whole crowd was trying to touch Him because power went out from Him which cured all." —Lk 6:19

Praise:  Forgiving a co-worker did not change Marsha's co-worker, but it did change Marsha.

Reference:  (For a related teaching, order our leaflet, The Bible on Money.)

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, February 23, 2016

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