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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

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Conversion of St. Paul


Acts 22:3-16 or Acts 9:1-22
Psalm 117:1-2
Mark 16:15-18

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chosen ones

"This man is the instrument I have chosen." —Acts 9:15

St. Paul was chosen to:

  • "bring [God's] name to the Gentiles and their kings and to the people of Israel" (Acts 9:15),
  • "suffer for [Jesus'] name" (Acts 9:16),
  • recover his "sight and be filled with Holy Spirit" (Acts 9:17),
  • be baptized into Jesus (Acts 9:18; Rm 6:3),
  • "proclaim in the synagogues that Jesus was the Son of God" (Acts 9:20),
  • silence his opponents "with his proofs that this Jesus was the Messiah" (Acts 9:22),
  • know God's "will, to look upon the Just One, and to hear the sound of His voice" (Acts 22:14), and
  • be God's servant and witness (Acts 26:16).

You too are chosen by God in many of the same ways that Paul was, but also in certain unique ways. God tells you: "It was not you who chose Me, it was I Who chose you to go forth and bear fruit" (Jn 15:16). You are "a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people He claims for His own" (1 Pt 2:9). "Because you are God's chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with heartfelt mercy, with kindness, humility, meekness, and patience" (Col 3:12).

You are a chosen child of God. You are blessed. Your life is very important. You are always loved. You are chosen.

Prayer:  Father, may we see many miraculous conversions today.

Promise:  "Go into the whole world and proclaim the good news to all creation. The man who believes in it and accepts baptism will be saved; the man who refuses to believe in it will be condemned." —Mk 16:15-16

Praise:  Jesus temporarily blinded St. Paul to enable him to open the eyes of the Gentiles and turn them from darkness to light, from Satan to God, obtaining forgiveness of their sins (see Acts 26:16-18).

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, August 10, 2016

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