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Thursday, September 28, 2017

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St. Wenceslaus
St. Lawrence Ruiz


Haggai 1:1-8
Psalm 149:1-6, 9
Luke 9:7-9

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the full gospel

"Consider your ways! You have sown much, but have brought in little." —Haggai 1:5-6

Have you worked hard but gotten little out of it except a feeling of discontent? Have you eaten, bought, or consumed a lot but "not been satisfied"? (Hg 1:6) Have you stimulated yourself through drinking, distractions, sexual sin, sports, or entertainment but "not been exhilarated"? (Hg 1:6) Do you have a sense of emptiness and loss?

We can be empty for many reasons. One common reason is that we may have put our concerns before those of God (Hg 1:2-4) and thereby have committed idolatry. "The worship of infamous idols is the reason and source and extremity of all evil" (Wis 14:27). When we go after empty idols, we become empty ourselves (Jer 2:5).

If you want to become fulfilled rather than empty, deny your very self (Lk 9:23) and give your life to Jesus, in Whom absolute fullness resides (Col 1:19). Hunger and thirst for righteousness, and you will be filled (Mt 5:6). Seek first God's kingdom, not yours, "and all these things will be given you besides" (Mt 6:33). "Do whatever He tells you" (Jn 2:5). Then, in response to your obedience, Jesus will fill you with the choice wine (Jn 2:10) of the Spirit (Acts 2:4). Jesus emptied Himself (Phil 2:7) to give us life to the full (Jn 10:10). Give your life to Him.

Prayer:  Father, I empty myself for love of You. Fill me.

Promise:  "The Lord loves His people, and He adorns the lowly with victory." —Ps 149:4

Praise:  St. Lawrence and his companions spread the gospel to the Philippines, Formosa, and Japan.

Reference:  (For a related teaching, order our leaflet Seek First The Kingdom.)

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, February 27, 2017

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