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Tuesday, January 2, 2018

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Sts. Basil the Great & Gregory Nazianzen


1 John 2:22-28
Psalm 98:1-4
John 1:19-28

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liars

"Tell us who you are." —John 1:22

God asks us two questions, "Who is the liar?" (1 Jn 2:22) and "Who are you?" (Jn 1:19) The two questions often go together. Sometimes the liars are us because we lie about who we are. We are tempted to give the impression we're the Messiah and the center of attraction. However, that's a false impression and a lie. We are also tempted to answer the question, "Who are you?" with "what we do." When someone asks, "Who are you?", we answer, "I worked there" or "I do this." These too are lies. We are people, not merely employees or workers.

We sometimes answer the question "Who are you?" by putting ourselves down, saying we're no good, failures who never made much money or got much recognition. Again, we lie because our identity does not depend on money or status.

Who are you? If baptized, you are a son or daughter of the Father, a brother or sister of Jesus, a temple of the Holy Spirit. You are a royal priesthood (1 Pt 2:9), purchased at the price of Jesus' blood (1 Cor 6:20). You are holy, chosen, and beloved (Col 3:12). You are destined for eternal life in heaven.

Prayer:  Father, give me the Christmas gift of knowing and believing who I am in You.

Promise:  "He Himself made us a promise and the promise is no less than this: eternal life." —1 Jn 2:25

Praise:  St. Gregory was called the Theologian because of his outstanding teachings on the Catholic faith.

Reference:  (Grow in humility by reading the Bible each day. A tape series that may help you is An Introduction to each Book of the Bible. It is thirty-two audio tapes starting with AV 21-1, Matthew and Mark, or seventeen video tapes starting with V-21.)

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, March 3, 2017

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