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Thursday, February 6, 2020

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St. Paul Miki & Companions


1 Kings 2:1-4, 10-12
1 Chronicles 29:10-12
Mark 6:7-13

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a spectacular life

"I am going the way of all mankind." —1 Kings 2:2

In today's Mass readings, King David dies. A quick summary of David's life could read like this:

  • David's courage was spectacular (1 Sm 17:34ff).
  • David's triumphs were spectacular (1 Kgs 17:49ff).
  • David's sins were spectacular (2 Sm 11:2-24; 2 Sm 24:2-26).
  • David's repentance was spectacular (Ps 51:3ff; 2 Sm 12:13ff).
  • David's worship was spectacular (see 2 Sm 6:14 and all the psalms of praise he wrote).
  • Scripture quotes the Lord as giving this summary of David, a summary to which all of us can aspire: "I have found David...to be a man after My own heart who will fulfill My every wish" (Acts 13:22; 1 Sm 13:14).

We may live a mundane life, which is not at all spectacular. Yet we are baptized children of God. We are thus greater than David (see Mt 11:11), and as God's beloved children, we are more than conquerors in Jesus (Rm 8:37). The Spirit of God rushed upon David (1 Sm 16:13), but David did not have the fullness of the Spirit, nor did he have the Sacraments, a saving knowledge of Jesus, or the great blessings of the Church. May we repent as David repented (Ps 51:3ff), dance as David danced (2 Sm 6:14), and be men and women after God's own heart who will fulfill His every wish.

Prayer:  "A clean heart create for me, O God; and a steadfast spirit renew within me" (Ps 51:12).

Promise:  "[The apostles] expelled many demons, anointed the sick with oil, and worked many cures." —Mk 6:13

Praise:  St. Paul Miki with his companions were spectacular in their witness and their martyrdom. St. Paul witnessed, "The only reason for my being killed is that I have taught the doctrine of Christ."

Reference:  (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)

Rescript:  †Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, July 8, 2019

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