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Friday, November 11, 2022

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St. Martin of Tours


2 John 4-9
Psalm 119:1-2, 10-11, 17-18
Luke 17:26-37

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the word on overcoming temptation

“Look out that you yourselves do not lose what you have worked for; you must receive your reward in full.” —2 John 8

Satan wants to keep people on the sideline and off the field of spiritual battle. If Satan cannot keep a Christian from entering the field of spiritual battle, his next tactic is to keep the Christian weak and defensive by constant accusations (Rv 12:10). He attempts to keep both Christians and non-Christians apathetic, fearful, paralyzed, distracted, and doubting.

However, one of Satan’s special opportunities is the occasion when a Christian achieves success in spiritual battle. Then the enemy will aim for a vicious takedown. When a powerful Christian falls, the evil one ensures much negative publicity, so that thousands of people will be tempted to turn away from the Lord and His Church.

God appreciates those who have labored long and hard for Him (see Heb 6:10). He does not want you to lose your reward; “you must receive your reward in full” (2 Jn 8). Satan aims to prevent that by pressing temptations upon you (see Mt 4:1ff). Thus, a verse from today’s psalm response is helpful: “Within my heart I treasure Your promise, that I may not sin against You” (Ps 119:11).

Therefore, read and treasure the Word of God each day (Ps 1:2; Acts 17:11). Store it in your heart and mind, then in time of temptation, the Holy Spirit can call to mind the Scripture verses stored in your heart to prevent you from succumbing to sin.

Prayer:  Father, give me the constant grace I need to keep my eyes fixed on Jesus (Heb 12:2).

Promise:  “Whoever tries to preserve his life will lose it; whoever loses it will keep it.” —Lk 17:33

Praise:  Family circumstances forced St. Martin of Tours to join the Roman army while still a teen. However, Martin later clothed a beggar and encountered the risen Christ.

Reference:  (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)

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