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Sunday, November 27, 2022

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First Sunday of Advent


Isaiah 2:1-5
Romans 13:11-14
Psalm 122:1-9
Matthew 24:37-44

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“ready to greet him when he comes”

“You must be prepared in the same way. The Son of Man is coming at the time you least expect.” —Matthew 24:44

Happy Advent! Advent is about the three comings of Christ:

1)      Jesus first came to earth as a Baby, humble and lowly, at Bethlehem (Lk 2:4ff).

2)      Jesus will come again at His Second Coming on the last day (Mt 24:30-31). This coming will be as majestic as His first coming was humble (1 Thes 4:16; Lk 21:27).

3)      The third coming of Jesus is the coming of the Eucharistic Jesus into our souls today. Jesus’ coming in Holy Communion is a humble coming, just as He came humbly to earth in Bethlehem. His Eucharistic coming is as easy to miss as was His coming at Bethlehem.

How prepared are we to meet the Eucharistic Jesus when He comes to us today? If we’re prepared for this “third” coming, we’ll welcome His first coming at Christmas and be prepared for His Second Coming.

Therefore, on this first day of the new Church Year, this day of new beginning, invite Jesus to come and reign in your life. “Seek first His kingship over you” (Mt 6:33). Be “sober and alert” (1 Pt 5:8), ever ready to greet Him when He comes. Live so that Jesus may never have to ask: “Why was no one there when I came?” (Is 50:2)

Prayer:  Father, may I prepare for the coming of Christ more than I would prepare for the most famous person on earth visiting my home.

Promise:  “It is now the hour for you to wake from sleep, for our salvation is closer than when we first accepted the faith.” —Rm 13:11

Praise:  “For You have rescued me from death, my feet, too, from stumbling; that I may walk before God in the light of the living” (Ps 56:14, NAB). Alleluia! Praise You, risen Jesus.

Reference:  (This teaching was submitted by a member of our editorial team.)

Rescript:  not yet

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