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Sunday, December 25, 2022

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Christmas


Isaiah 52:7-10
Hebrews 1:1-6
Psalm 98:1-6
John 1:1-18

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“The Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us.” —John 1:14

“Jesus Christ is true God and true man” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 464). At His birth, Jesus moved from the womb of Mary to the outside world. This made it possible for people to relate to Him in a personal way. Jesus was then able to be held, kissed, touched, seen, and heard. He was also able to be hit, hurt, rejected, and crucified. The change from being in the womb to living in the outside world is dangerous. That’s why we celebrate a birth. A dangerous transition has been made without any serious problems, although the danger of living in a fallen world still remains.

By the power of the Holy Spirit, we can still relate to Jesus in a personal way. We can be like Mary, Joseph, the shepherds, the wise men, Simeon, and Anna. We can lavish our love on Jesus — person to Person. However, we can also be like Herod by rejecting Jesus and refusing to make any room for Him in our lives and hearts (see Lk 2:7). Christmas reminds us that Jesus remains available to us on a person to Person basis.

On this first day of the Christmas season, obey the first commandment of all. Love the Lord with all your heart, all your soul, all your strength, and all your mind (Lk 10:27).

Prayer:  Jesus, on this Christmas Day, I decide to love You completely, unconditionally, and forever by Your grace.

Promise:  “Of His fullness we have all had a share — love following upon love.” —Jn 1:16

Praise:  “I come to proclaim good news to you — tidings of great joy to be shared by the whole people. This day in David’s city a Savior has been born to you, the Messiah and Lord” (Lk 2:10-11). Merry Christmas!

Reference:  

Rescript:  "In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant the Nihil Obstat for the publication One Bread, One Body covering the time period from December 1,2022 through January 31,2023. Reverend Steve J. Angi, Chancellor, Vicar General, Archdiocese of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio April 12, 2022"

The Nihil Obstat ("Permission to Publish") is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted the Nihil Obstat agree with the contents, opinions, or statements expressed.